Case rates jump 54.6% | News, Sports, Jobs

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The number of COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people in Ohio has increased 54.6% over the past three weeks.

It was the fourth consecutive week of increases, reaching levels not seen since February.

Additionally, the total number of people in Ohio hospitals with COVID-19 has topped 1,000 a day since July 14 after falling more than four months below it.

There were 391.4 cases of COVID-19 per 100,000 population for the two-week period between July 6 and Wednesday, compared to 334.1 cases per 100,000 last week, according to data provided Thursday by the Ministry of Health. Ohio Health.

Cases per 100,000 haven’t been this high since 481 were reported on February 10 by the ODH.

Hospitalizations for COVID-19 were at 1,166 on Thursday, according to statistics from the Ohio Hospital Association. That’s more than 1,000 a day for eight consecutive days. Prior to July 14, it last reached 1,000 on March 3.

Twenty-two deaths from COVID-19 have been reported by the ODH since last week.

The four straight weeks of increases come after four straight weeks of modest declines. Before that, there were eight weeks of increases and before that, 10 consecutive weeks of declines.

Cases in Mahoning, Trumbull and Columbiana have increased this week, although numbers in those counties are among the lowest in Ohio.

Ohio had 277.4 cases per 100,000 people two weeks ago, 253.2 cases per 100,000 people three weeks ago, 241.2 cases per 100,000 people four weeks ago and 251.9 cases per 100,000 inhabitants five weeks ago.

It hit a record high of 2,154.8 COVID-19 cases per 100,000 population on January 20.

Of the state’s 88 counties, 86 had more than 200 cases per 100,000 people and 69 had more than 300 cases per 100,000.

The ODH moved on March 13 from daily reports to weekly reports. Reports are provided on Thursdays.

A total of 26,610 cases of COVID-19 were reported last week as of Thursday.

In comparison, 24,465 cases of COVID-19 were reported last week, 18,838 cases of COVID-19 two weeks ago, 17,225 cases of COVID-19 three weeks ago, 16,159 cases of COVID-19 four weeks ago and 16,169 cases of COVID-19 five weeks ago.

VALLEY PRICES

Mahoning is 68th in the state this week among 88 counties with 315.3 COVID-19 cases per 100,000 population.

It was 63rd last week with 279 COVID-19 cases per 100,000 population.

Mahoning was 54th two weeks ago with 234.8 COVID-19 cases per 100,000 population, 48th three weeks ago with 230.9 COVID-19 cases per 100,000 population, 47th four weeks ago with 213 .8 COVID-19 cases per 100,000 population and 29th five weeks ago with 255.8 COVID-19 cases per 100,000.

Trumbull is 71st in the state this week with 294 COVID-19 cases per 100,000 population.

It was 64th last week with 275.8 COVID-19 cases per 100,000 population.

Trumbull was 69th two weeks ago with 206.6 COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people, 62nd three weeks ago with 198 COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people, 54th four weeks ago with 202 cases of COVID-19 per 100,000 population and 42nd five weeks ago with 229.8 COVID-19 cases per 100,000.

Columbiana is 75th this week with 287.6 COVID-19 cases per 100,000 population.

It was 79th last week with 216.9 COVID-19 cases per 100,000 population.

Columbiana was 81st two weeks ago with 175.7 COVID-19 cases per 100,000 population, 83rd three weeks ago with 148.2 COVID-19 cases per 100,000 population, also 83rd four weeks ago with 139.4 COVID-19 cases per 100,000 population and 65th five weeks ago with 187.5 COVID-19 cases per 100,000 population.

The ODH measures cases per 100,000 population among counties to get a fair comparison, as the total number of cases would likely result in a higher ranking of the most populous counties.

The ODH’s Coronavirus Wastewater Monitoring Network also showed a 130% increase in COVID-19 levels at the Warren Pollution Control Department between June 21 and Sunday. The increase is considered “substantial” by the ODH. It is up 22.5% at the Youngstown wastewater treatment plant, which is considered “constant” by the ODH.

Various state and other agencies collect sewage samples to test for the presence of “gene copies/fragments of the virus that causes the disease”, according to the ODH.



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